National Multicultural Western Heritage
Museum Hall of Fame Mission

The National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum and Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Honorees are inducted into The National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum Hall of Fame once a year at the annual Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Banquet.

View a History of the National Multicultural


Western Heritage Museum Hall of Fame Inductees.

The 17th Annual Hall of Fame Inductions Details

The Induction Ceremony Banquet for the 17th Annual Hall of Fame Inductions is currently scheduled to take place on Saturday, July 24, 2021, at the SpringHill Suites Fort Worth Historic Stockyards, 2315 N. Main Street, Fort Worth, TX 76164, as part of the Museum's National Day of the American Cowboy celebration activities. A Selection Committee meets in the Spring each year to review the nominations and name the new Inductees. Nominations are accepted throughout the year. If you would like to nominate someone, please complete the 2021 2022  View the list of Hall of Fame Inductees 

 

How to Make A Nomination for Induction to the Hall of Fame

  • NATIONAL MULTICULTURAL WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM
    AND HALL OF FAME
  • 2022 NOMINATION APPLICATION FORM
  • ***NOMINATION DEADLINE: December 31, 2021***
  • Business Office – 2029 North Main Street, Fort Worth, Texas, 76164-8510
  • Office: 817-922-9999 Fax: 817 923-9304
  • Email: gaustin@cowboysofcolor.org

2021 Hall of Fame Inductees

The National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum and Hall of Fame is dedicated to honoring and documenting
the lives of men and women who have made exemplary contributions to Western Heritage, past and present.

2021 Hall of Fame Events
July 23rd-24th

>>Purchase Your Tickets to the 2021 Hall of Fame Induction Banquet Today!

Obba Babatundé

2021 Hall of Fame Inductee

Obba Babatundé is an actor, singer, dancer, director, writer, and producer. Obba's breadth of work is known worldwide by audiences of all ages, and his face is one of the most recognizable in the entertainment industry. His career spans over 4 decades and he is a unique breed in today's industry as a triple-threat (and more). Obba is comfortable in the expression of various musical instruments and all forms of dance. In addition to his award-winning performances on stage and screen, he is a nationally renowned speaker and master class teacher for adult and young audiences alike. Obba has often been referred to and is considered a 'living legend' and is a treasured role model to actors and entertainers of all generations. Central to Obba's career is his unrelenting work ethic and his pursuit of a standard of excellence in everything he does.

Amongst Obba's many professional awards and nominations is his Daytime Emmy Award win (2016) for CBS's Bold & the Beautiful, his Emmy nominated performance in the HBO movie "Miss Evers' Boys," his Tony Award nomination for his role as "C.C. White," in the original Broadway cast of "Dreamgirls", his "Best Actor" Award win for the Musical "Sammy" from the San Diego Critic's Circle Awards, his NAACP Image Award win as "Best Actor" for his role as "Sarge" in "A Soldiers Play", the NAACP Trailblazer Award win, an NAACP Image Award-nominated performance in the HBO movie "Introducing Dorothy Dandridge," multiple Ovation Award nominations, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Peachtree Village International Film Festival. Obba has appeared in more than 17 stage productions (several on Broadway), 33 films, 60+ television series and made-for-television movies. Presently, Obba can be seen in 4 prime-time series for; Netflix (Dear White People), Showtime (I'm Dying Up Here), Comedy Central (Detroiters) and CBS (Bold & Beautiful). Many people will remember him from his groundbreaking entry into the entertainment industry during his international tour and co-starring role with Liza Minnelli in "Liza in Concert", which lead to his close relationship with professional mentor, Sammy Davis Jr. Obba's contributions and starring role (as CC White) in the original production of Dreamgirls on Broadway is one of his most treasured accomplishments.

His distinct, unique speaking and singing voice can be heard in multiple ads, commercials, as well as narration for docu-dramas. Obba has dedicated his life and career to sharing his time, expertise, and creative talents with all people, be it professional or personal. He has an uncanny way of making everyone feel as if he is always speaking to them directly and personally. In addition to his on-going acting and artistic projects, Obba is constantly being asked to teach, emcee, host, serve as a keynote speaker and facilitate classes, events, festivals, and projects around the world. He leaves an indelible mark everywhere he goes. Obba often says "your do is not your who." When asked to explain, he says "your do is how you affect change in your life. Your who if how you affect change in someone else's life."

Obba's journey into the entertainment industry became intentional in high school when he began writing poetry and then, while attending Brooklyn College. His pursuits deepened when he began to expand his poems into one-act plays. Simultaneously, he immersed himself into the New York theatre and dance worlds. Studying under many noted directors and choreographers like Geoffrey Holder, Bob Fossey, Michael Bennett, Hal Prince, Thelma Hill, Frank Hatchett, Henry LeTang, Louis Johnson and Titos Sompa just to name a few. Some little-known facts about Obba are that he has a strong background rooted in the educational field. He was a co-founder with his brother Akin Babatundé and teacher of one of NYC's first arts-based schools (in Brooklyn, NY). He is fluent in American Sign Language (self-taught), a horse whisperer, as well as a rodeo competitor. Obba is a dedicated father and proud grandfather. It has been said, that Obba has a way of communicating that helps inspire, encourage, and enlighten through his stories and phrases that he identifies as "Obba-isms." "As proud as I am of all that I have done, I am even more excited about what I am to do." - Obba Babatundé

Darrell Barron

2021 Hall of Fame Inductee

One of the most colorful and recognized men in the rodeo world, Darrell Barron has done it all! During his college days where he was a 2-time qualifier for the College National Finals, Darrell competed in Bareback, Steer Wrestling, Bull Riding, Tie-Down and Team Roping events. He won the CNFR Steer Wrestling Championship in 1975. As a member of the PRCA since 1971, he has competed in Bareback, Steer Wrestling and Team Roping events. He's been a pickup man for some of the best contractors in the business including Harry Vold, Christensen Brothers, and Beutler and Son Rodeo Company. Darrell has won at Cheyenne, Phillipsburg, Santa Fe, and Colorado Springs! He knows rodeo, knows what it takes to compete, and is one of the most well rounded and respected men in the sport.

With that kind of background, it was a natural move for Darrell Barron's expertise to be in demand on the arena floor. For 16 years he served as Arena Director for the College National Finals Rodeo and was Livestock Superintendent and Arena Director for the Texas Circuit Finals for 15 years. From 1976-1987, Darrell was Livestock Superintendent and Riding Event Chute Boss for Cheyenne Frontier Days and has served in the same capacity for other major events across the country. Darrell Barron has been easily recognizable at the Wrangler National Finals since 1982 where, with his distinctive mustache, hat, and high-top cowboy boots, he has directed activities as the Riding Event Chute Boss.

With such a resume, it is no wonder that Darrell Barron serves as Director of the Rodeo Historical Society for the National Cowboy and western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City and in 2010 became Director of the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame in Fort Worth. In 2008, Darrell was honored to be inducted into the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame.

When he's not busy with some of the duties above, Darrell enjoys team roping, building spurs, and working with horses with his wife Lee.

What does Darrell have to say about Priefert' "In my 35 years around the rodeo industry, I have worked with a variety of chute equipment manufacturers. However, nothing compares to Priefert bucking chutes when it comes to a secure system that includes safety for both contestants and livestock or functional components and reliability."

We are proud that men like Darrell recognize what we have accomplished and are willing to share their respected opinion with others who may be trying to decide what equipment is best for their rodeo!

 

Aldrich Everett

2021 Hall of Fame Inductee

Aldrich Lynn Everett was born July 6, 1941, in Webster, Florida, to Willie James and Willie Mae (Mitchell) Everett.  Aldrich aka “Al” has 6 sisters and 6 brothers with him being the eighth born of thirteen children. Al attended Mills High Elementary for both primary and secondary education. At the age of 8 years Al and his brothers would wake in the early morning hours at daybreak to work on the farm prior to attending school. Al sometimes walked, rode horses, rode the tractor, or caught the school bus to school. After school Al would walk, ride a horse, ride the tractor, or catch the bus to work on the farm with his father Willie James Everett. Once Al arrived on the farm he would work with the cattle (i.e.: spraying, feeding, lassoing, branding or share taking) planting, transplanting, stripping cane irrigating the plants or whatever needed to be done. After working on the farm with his father, Al went to basketball practice and homework would be done late at night. Al grew up in a family of people that trained horses. Al’s father had trailers that pulled behind the trucks and Al was responsible for transporting the livestock for other people who didn’t have transportation to get their cattle to the sale barn. Al also attended to cattle on ranches where people could not or did not know how to take care of the cattle. All of this led to Al’s passion of working with cows and horses. This path led Al to become ranch owner and cowboy until this day.

At 18 years old, Al was a Foreman of Little River Ranch in Pasco County in Dade City, FL. As a foreman of the ranch Al branded, castrated, and performed duties of the veterinarians of all dominions. Al was very a highly skilled and experienced animal handler; and his degree of knowledge secured his position. The ranch owner was W.M. Larkins, and that ranch still exists today. In 1958 – 1959 Al and his brothers put on the first all black rodeo on State Road 200 in Hernando County. The property owners where the rodeo was held was owned by The Bellamy Brothers. Al and his brother Thomas and other friends were riders in the rodeo while his brother Lucious performed as the rodeo clown. They also had a job catching cattle off 20,000 acres in Hernando County that borders the Withchoochee River. In 1964, Al quit the ranch and attended Johnson Junior College in Leesburg, FL for two years. When the schools were integrated, the name of Johnson Junior College was changed to Lake Sumter Community College. Al’s major was Physical Education. After attending Johnson Junior College, Al was drafted into the United States Army in 1966. Al was in the Army for two years. Al took basic training in Fort Bennett, Georgia. Al took AIT at Port Odd, California and he was a member of the 101st Airborne Division ETS out of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Al also attended Jones Business College for one year and he attended Indian River Community College (IRCC) for one year (both located) in Fort Pierce, FL.

In 1970, Al started Everett Brother’s Harvesting where he bought and sold fruit and vegetables that he purchased from other companies. With the proceeds made from Everett Brother’s Harvesting, Al was able to expand his farm by buying and selling cattle from his ranch. This brought Al back to his roots of breaking in and training horses and attending to his cattle. After all the things Al wanted to be in life, Al wanted to be a cowboy/ranch owner and work with his horses and cows. Being a cowboy and an owner of a ranch is what Al is most proud of and what Al wanted to be even as a child, and he reached his goal. Al’s words of wisdom to anyone wanting to be a cowboy, “make sure that you love animals and that it makes you happy, don’t just do it for the money. Be able to give others good advice and show them the ropes to make them better at working with the animals, nursing them back to health and being of assistance to the life of the animals that you’ll be working with.”

Clarence Gonzales* 

2021 Hall of Fame Inductee

Clarence was born to Horace Gonzales and Celeste Hunt Gonzales March 31, 1931, in San Antonio, TX. As soon as he was able Clarence attended his first rodeo at a county fair. His love for rodeo took him out of his childhood home to Albert George Ranch (which today is a historical park) in Booth/Richmond, TX. As a ranch hand Clarence love for rodeo grew while working with horses and cattle. In 1958, he attended the Madison Square Garden Rodeo Championship in New York and later in 1972 in Harlem New York he had a role in the movie “Black Rodeo” based on Black cowboys coming to New York featuring Muhammad Ali. Clarence has several awards, buckles, and trophies from the numerous rodeos he had participated in. In early years, he competed in all events including bronc riding, bull riding, calf roping, and steer wrestling. But steer wrestling turned out to be his favorite rodeo event.

Clarence was married to Zelma Ruth Solomon and they had 5 children, (Rynae Grant), earlier marriage of Zelma. He settled in Richmond, TX, where they raised their family. Clarence attended as many rodeo events as he could find within traveling distance. He worked and retired from Brown and Root construction in 1993. After retirement, Clarence started promoting rodeos in small towns surrounding the Richmond, TX, area such as Kendleton, Egypt and McBeth.

Clarence still has the spirit of rodeo in his soul and it was passed down to his youngest son Kevin whose love for rodeo was as great as his father’s as they traveled to many rodeos together. All the family helped put on the promotion of the rodeos with his sons helping out in any capacity needed to help the event succeed. Clarence’s love for rodeo will be with him till his dying days.

Lynn Hart

Lyndon “Lynn” Hart

2021 Hall of Fame Inductee

 

Lynn (Smokey) Hart was born December 11, 1960 in Omaha, Nebraska. He was abandoned three days after being born and placed in a foster home without a name. Lynn never knew either of his biological parents (African American father and Native American mother). He was raised in Chancellor, South Dakota by a single German women and devoted Christian, Elizabeth Ulfers. Lynn was raised in the church and grew up on a corn farm in a German community until the passing of his foster mother, when he was 10. He was immediately shipped off to Landover, MD and placed in a foster home again and subsequently adopted by Jim and Lois Hart. The Harts also adopted twin girls who were also mixed (black and white). In the 1960’s it was not common for whites to adopt mixed children, yet the Harts did and accepted the children as their own. Lynn was first exposed to people of color during his time in Maryland. Prior to that all he knew about were white people. It was a cultural shock for Lynn. He later found that learning how to be black and native American was a bit of a challenge to say the least. Despite the challenges Lynn become proud as he learned about his heritage.

After a couple of years in Maryland, Lynn let his parents know that he longed to return to South Dakota. The Harts were professors at Prince George’s College in Maryland, but Lois had roots in Watertown, South Dakota and out of the love the Harts had for their son Lynn and their fear he would want to leave them, they gave up their careers in teaching and moved the family to Watertown, SD to the delight of Lynn. Lynn graduated from Watertown High School. Lynn proudly served his country as a United States Marine. After being discharged, Lynn became a Ranch Hand at the Badlands Ranch in Reva, SD. There he learned everything a ranch hand does. He often states, that if you looked up Ranch Hand in Webster’s Dictionary, you’d probably see his picture.

As Lynn grew up, he became subjected to the challenges of two oppressed minorities in America (African American and the Native American), even though the Hart’s loved him and his sisters dearly. Lynn became an advocate and community activist for both ethnicities of his heritage.

In 1990, Lynn fought vigorously and testified before the State Affairs Committee of the House of Representatives in South Dakota. At the time, South Dakota was one of four states in the country that did not recognize Martin Luther King’s birthday as a National holiday. His relentless efforts and testimony were instrumental for not only getting a bill passed to recognize King’s birthday, but also a bill for “Native American Day” on the second Monday in October, replacing Columbus Day. This legislation led Governor Mickelson to support a measure that pledged 1990 as the Year of Reconciliation. This resulted in the opening of dialogue between Indians and non-Indians in South Dakota. Subsequently, Lynn was honored by state representatives for his efforts.

On January 13, 1992, Mrs. Coretta Scott King, music legend Stevie Wonder and then FBI director William Sessions, honored and presented Lynn with the “National Making of King Holiday Award,” in Washington, D.C. on behalf of the Martin Luther King Federal Holiday Committee.

Lynn is a cowboy that has worked as a ranch hand and stunt man. Lynn was a rodeo bull-rider and fighter during a long-term association with the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo. Lynn designed the National logo for the Native American Women Warriors. Lynn testified again and was instrumental in the passing of HB1242 Tribal ID bill in South Dakota enacted July 3, 2011 which allowed all Tribal ID’s to be accepted in South Dakota as a legal form of identification.

Lynn was a personal guest of the King family’s 50th Anniversary of the “I Have a Dream Speech and March on Washington” in 2013.

Currently Lynn is a husband and father and has a strong passion to help develop and provide opportunities for future generations of African and Native American leaders. Lynn speaks and teaches on reservations about parts of history that seem to have been inadvertently omitted from school textbooks. Lynn tells others, “Being a person of strong cultures is the greatest blessings of all; my DNA make me rise whenever I fall.”

 

 

 

 

 

Jean Prescott 

2021 Hall of Fame Inductee

Born and raised in West Texas, to Earl Victor and Wanda Joyce (Stroud) Bruce, Jean Prescott grew up horseback living and loving the rural western lifestyle. This way of life and her love of music came together over the years and led to the best of both worlds for her.  Jean’s music is referred to as “The spiritual essence of the west”.  With that in mind, the Texas Legislature recognized Jean for her contribution to the preservation of Texas history through her music.  Jean’s songs and her beautiful delivery of them paint vivid musical pictures of the way of life in the real west of yesterday and today.

2018 marked the 25th anniversary of Jean’s full-time music career and she loves to share her songs with her fans today just as much now as she did in the very beginning.  This multiple award-winning singer/songwriter is widely appreciated for her rich, alto voice and her warm stage presence that draws her audience into each song she sings.  Sometimes called “The First Lady of Western Music”, Jean is proud to have the opportunity to entertain and mentor young musicians and singers who also love the western lifestyle and its music.

Jean is devoted to God, her family, her country and cowboy and western music and its preservation.  Many of her songs tell stories of the women of the west then and now.  Passing down the history of their experiences is something that is near and dear to Jean’s heart.

In 2017, Jean and her husband Gary released their multiple award-winning CD “Satisfied Hearts”.  Jean says, “Singing from a satisfied heart is what it’s all about.”  It ranked in the top 10 of the most played CDs by western music DJs for over 2 years.  And, at one time a record-breaking five songs from this CD were included in the Top 10 Western Songs played by western DJs!

Dedicated to pursuing and preserving the way of life they love, Jean and singer/songwriter husband, Gary Prescott, make their home south of Abilene, Texas, on a small ranch where they raise Black Angus cattle, and she continues to write songs about the cowboy way of life.

 

 

View the 2018 and 2019 Hall of Fame Honorees


The Nominations for 2021 Hall of Fame Induction has closed. 

How to Make A Nomination for Induction to the 2022 Hall of Fame

The National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum and Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Honorees are inducted into The National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum Hall of Fame once a year at the annual Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Banquet. The Induction Ceremony Banquet for the 17th Annual Hall of Fame Inductions is currently scheduled to take place on Saturday, July 24, 2021, at the SpringHill Suites Fort Worth Historic Stockyards, 2315 N. Main Street, Fort Worth, TX 76164, as part of the Museum's National Day of the American Cowboy celebration activities. A Selection Committee meets in the Spring each year to review the nominations and name the new Inductees. Nominations are accepted throughout the year. If you would like to nominate someone, please complete the 2022 NOMINATION FORM keeping the Museum's Mission Statement in mind.  

If you would like to nominate an individual, living or deceased, please complete this form, keeping our Mission Statement in mind. The National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum and Hall of Fame honors those men and women who have made a significant contribution to Western Heritage, past and present. Please note the required biography format & photo must be attached to be considered. (See Nomination Procedures and Bio Sample. Photo – JPEG). Please type or print clearly on the application and other information you are submitting.

Download a Copy of the 2022 Hall of Fame Nomination Form

The Hall of Fame is dedicated to honoring and documenting the lives of men and women who have made exemplary contributions to Western Heritage, past and present. The museum and hall of fame is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

  • Honorees are inducted into Hall of Fame once a year. The 2021 Hall of Fame Inductions will take place during the weekend of July 22-23, 2022, in Fort Worth, Texas. 
  • The museum’s Hall of Fame Committee will review the nomination applications after the closing date to select the new Inductees, who will then be notified. Nominations are accepted throughout the year. If you would like to nominate someone, please complete the separate NOMINATION FORM and submit with the required biography and photograph keeping the Mission Statement in mind, being able to document the nominee’s historically significant accomplishments and contributions to western history and culture. Incomplete applications will not be accepted. All requested information in the requested format must be submitted.

 

2022 HALL OF FAME NOMINATION PROCEDURE

 

Individuals or organizations may request nomination forms be sent to them by emailing gaustin@cowboysofcolor.org; calling the museum business office at 817-922-9999; or the museum directly at 817-534-8801. You may also download the application from the website at HERE. All applications must be completed by the deadline date: December 31, 2021; and submitted via Email or mailed for consideration in the 2022 Hall of Fame Induction process.

All applications are kept on file and reviewed each year for induction consideration. (It is not necessary to formally re-nominate an individual if they are not selected during a present year, however, you may submit additional information that you feel will be important in the review process). If you are in doubt regarding certain information about the nominee please enter “best known, unknown or not applicable.”

If you would like to nominate an individual, living or deceased, please complete this form, keeping our Mission Statement in mind. The National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum and Hall of Fame honors those men and women who have made a significant contribution to Western Heritage, past and present. Please note the required biography format & photo must be attached to be considered. (See Nomination Procedures and Bio Sample. Photo – JPEG). Please type or print clearly on the application and other information you are submitting.

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